Voices of Mental Health Podcast

I got the chance to talk with Lauren Valko from the Voices of Mental Health podcast.

But yeah, that morning routine is not something easy to do. Mainly not easy to not actually look at your phone, open your computer right away. I remember the first shoot, three weeks just in a row, I’d wake up and the first thing you want to do is slap your hand over onto the phone and with one eye start scrolling through Instagram to see what happened, what you missed out on.

Take a break and give it a listen!


Below is the Podcast : 35 Minute 33 Second listen

And a written text of the full interview : 26 minutes 19 second read

 

I have also sectioned of the specific topics we touched on so you can go directly to that section and read!

 
 
 

Lauren Valko

Hey, everyone. And welcome to episode 50 of the Voices of Mental Health Podcast. I'm your co-host Lauren today, and on our episode, we are talking with Paul Marlow. And Paul and I actually connected through Twitter, and he was interested in coming on, and I just really loved his story, and pretty much just everything that I saw him sharing about online, and so I'm really excited to have him on today. So Paul, thank you so much for joining us. Welcome, and let's just get started by having you tell the listeners a little bit about yourself.

Paul Marlow

Amazing. Thank you for having me on Lauren, first of all. Second of all, thank you for saying I'm good at Twitter, I've been working really hard at that, to get better on that platform. It's a time consumer, but a great area I think, especially for the mental health community. As for myself, a quick thing, I've dealt with some depression, I deal with PTSD from an issue in the past, the biggest thing is that my father passed 14 months ago now, and that really affected me far more than what I expected. So kind of what I decided to do was talk about it to the world, and not be ashamed of it, and not be afraid to say the things that others might judge me for, through Instagram, through Twitter, through now my blog and other social media aspects and in general, just people in general. When they tell me they have things going on, I tell them I do too. Just one-on-one, face-to-face, where it's the most important I feel.

So I've taken that in the last 14 months, and just kept doing that, just for myself, and I realized that kind of related to a lot of people, and I started getting feedback from people saying, "Thank you for this." And then I started putting content out there that I thought helped me, I knew helped me and I thought it might help someone else. And I started getting feedback saying, "Thank you for putting it out there, that helped me." And then it just kind of snowballing from there, just trying to help anyone out that I can, everyday. Really is where I'm going with this.

 

Men’s Mental Health Stigma

 

Lauren

That's really great, and I just, I love seeing, especially people of all genders, especially men opening up, really sharing their story, because I feel like and you can tell me if you've experienced this too, but it seems like we still are in, we're in progress getting it to be where men feel like they can open up about the negative stigma attached to mental health. Have you found that to be hard for you?

Paul

I don't even, I think we're before progress to be honest with you.

It's definitely more out there, which is amazing, and it's great and we have these major athletes talking about it. Especially basketball and other sports, where it really gets recognized, and some actors. But unfortunately, you can't always relate to them. They say it once, and they don't really talk daily about it, so it's hard for the regular person to everyday go back to that. But the men thing is, yeah. We are, it is, but I really think it's... I looked online and I'm doing some analytics to understand how many people are talking about it, so in my blogs I can understand where I'm going.

And I searched mental health statistics, and there was about two and a half million hits, just in the general area of that. I searched men's mental health statistics and there was 20,000 hits. That's all through America.

Lauren

Oh my gosh.

Paul

Look at that difference. So, really, I don't think we should isolate on men’s mental health stigma, because everybody needs help, but really it's a very, it's a piece of sand compared to a mountain, I think of where we're going to head with it.

Lauren

Why do you think there's such a big difference?

Paul

We're men. We're alpha. Even if it's not us alpha, it's society, we feel thinks we need to be alpha. We feel we have to, even if we don't say, but innately down inside us, our core being from whoever we were in the past is society and growing up through the ages. It's, yeah, we're supposed to be the guy. That's it, the guy, the man. The alpha. It's if you're the person, it's changing which is great. I think these women are taking over and leading and everything, that's great. But most people, their main go to is a male objective towards leading the pack. And I think that's still in the back of peoples minds. And when they want to talk about it, they want a hushed voice. They don't want it to be heard by everybody else. So yeah, I'm glad that I've found that it doesn't affect me at all when I talk about it. It helps me.

But it doesn't affect how people look at me. It has not affected my business. It has not affected my personal being. It has not affected anything in a negative way, only positive way. I've seen no negative aspects from it. No one's said anything, no one's made fun of me, which is positive. I just hope more people can make that jump.

 

Creating Daily Routines for Better Mental Health

 

Lauren

Yeah, and that's really great to hear that it's been a really positive experience for you and really just kind of breaking through that whole idea of, "Man up. Just deal with it. Don't talk about what's going on in your mind." And we were talking about Twitter, and obviously, that's how we met. And yeah, I think that, I'm impressed with your Twitter game, because you just seem so connected with everyone, and everything you share is positive and just really open and everything. And I watched, I believe it was, I think it was a blog post on your website that I had read about your daily routine and how you don't actually check any kind of technology, is it for an hour before you get up? Or after you get up?

Paul

Essentially, it's 45 minutes to an hour, but I think in general actually from waking up to the end of my routine, it's closest to 60 minutes after I have actually opened my eyes that I do that.

Well, thank you for reading the blog post. You put the time in to write them, but you never know if anyone's going to read them. So thank you.

Lauren

Oh, it's great. Yeah, I really enjoyed it.

Paul

But yeah, that morning routine is not something easy to do. Mainly not easy to not actually look at your phone, open your computer right away. I remember the first shoot, three weeks just in a row, I'd wake up and the first thing you want to do is slap your hand over onto the phone and with one eye start scrolling through Instagram to see what happened, what you missed out on. And it ate at me throughout that hour of my time as I was going through my reading, where I would read for 10 minutes out of a novel and I would drink hot lemon water to kind of get my digestion and everything going, in my system. And then meditate for 10-15 minutes, and then get my coffee boiling, and then finally sit down. And the first, I remember the first month or two, I had this innate thing inside me like pushing me to my phone, thinking about it, thinking. It was super hard not to think about it.

Which was kind of scary, because it's something that's just part of your day, and you're like, "I need to use it, I need to use it." Even though I wasn't going to use it for anything positive, I was just going to scroll through a feed and double tap some Instagram photos and see who liked mine, so I could get a little positive kickback in the morning. But it has definitely helped me just slowly get yourself into the day, make sure your brain is ready and your body is ready along with your brain to take that first step into this crazy world of ours. And that's waking up and going and being about yourself, focusing on you, working on bettering you, before you dive into whatever it is you do. It could not even be Instagram, it could not even be your phone. It's just whatever kind of gives you stress or makes the day started, whatever that is, give yourself some you time.

Lauren

Definitely. Yeah. And I love that. And that's definitely one thing that I struggle with personally, is checking the phone as soon as I wake up. And it's one thing that a lot of my morning routine, I've gotten down that works for me, but that is still such a struggle. It's almost like I need to look at my phone to get myself to wake up, you know? I guess it's the light, looking at the light and being engaged. So how did you stop doing that? Did you replace it with something else? Did you just make yourself just pop out of bed? What did you do?

Paul

I understand 100% what you're saying. It pulls you, it's like a gravitational force field, and it's pulling you to look at this thing. Because, it's like, it's those sensory things. It's like, how many likes did I get over last night? Who tweeted me? Do I have any emails going on? Even though you don't need to see it right now, nothing is going on. It's 7:00 AM in the morning. But I had the exact same thing. I'm either lucky or it's not lucky, I did it in a time of necessity. This was when I was actually in my darkest depression, I've always been able to sleep. I missed, I didn't go to work for a month when I was seriously depressed.

But whatever, I have found out when I am depressed, I don't get a lot done in the sense of my work and such. But if I can find a vision, a goal, something that I think will better myself over time, if I practice it daily, I'm very good at doing daily things and practicing them to hopefully in the future become better. I don't need that instant gratification. I like kind of seeing it come. So one of those things was for me, I believed, I've heard people talk about this, I've listened to podcasts, I've red blogs, these people do say it's a good thing for you, so you know what? I'm going to try it.

There's a reason for them saying it, if I don't like it, I won't do it any longer. But for me, it was just that. I'm like, this is a simple thing to do. My morning, if I get that done, and I finish that in the morning, that's a positive win for me. And you know, if I'm depressed the rest of the day, then I'll be depressed and I'll be on my phone all day long or whatever happens. But my biggest thing was, morning routine was to get that win, to get something done that I knew I could do. I didn't have to rely on the world. It was just something that, if I get this done today, then I can go and lay in bed the rest of the day and just do nothing, but I can still feel like I achieved something. So it was just that mindset. Push through, push through, push through.

Lauren

So just kind of focusing on knowing that it's going to make you feel better overall, that's the reward.

Paul

Yeah, yeah. Or it's the easiest thing that I can do right now to make me feel better. Like, it's either go see a therapist. It's go run a mile every day, it's go to this, how easy is that? Just not look at your phone for 60 minutes, compared to all the other things we can do in the world that might make us feel better. This it, if you break it down, this is probably one of the most basic things that I can do right now, without really exerting any energy or force. It's just willpower and brain power. Once I do that, then I can try to do something that will better myself even more. So I'm always trying to find the easiest win when I'm in a dark place. And that was one of the easiest wins because it was right beside me. It was beside me, it was beside me, within two feet for the whole 60 minutes. But if I could just get enough willpower not to look at it, I was doing something positive.

Lauren

Yeah, and then it kind of becomes a habit, so it's easier to continue doing in the day because it feels good.

Paul

Yeah. Yes, 100%. Right now, I love it. I don't think about going on it, I have no reason to go on it. Something happens a day or two in a row, I will feel it in my head until about noon. I can tell there's a fog, there's a cloud. I got in too early, and I didn't do my routine to kind of bring me peacefully into the world and it's noticeable.

Lauren

So when that happens, when you do notice that maybe things didn't start off as they were supposed to, which I mean, we all have days like that. Right? Things don't, you just don't feel your best. What do you do in those moments, when you're like, "Oh man, I didn't do my morning routine that would have helped me, and now I'm not feeling good." Do you go back to that same, like what's one little thing I can do?

Paul

Yeah, yeah. Definitely. It's really, you have to assess. It's like that you have to assess how bad it is. Like, am I... if it doesn't happen sometimes, I'm super depressed, like if it's really bad, then it's okay, do I try to stave this off and salvage the day? Or do I just accept it and let whatever wave happen and prepare for tomorrow to do it better? That's one of the things that has to happen. It's just you have to realize, it's only a day. It's only 12 more hours. Just deal with whatever is happening, last it out, prepare myself at night to have a better day tomorrow. Or if it's something where it's a little fuzzy, like I just messed up a little bit there, let me counteract this with something, for me, I won't go back into the routine, because usually I'm fully into something. Either I'm at my home working, or you're out at work or doing something, or whatever it may be, I then try to clear my head other ways, which is generally I will go for a walk.

Put a podcast on and just go for a 30-40 minute walk. Second thing is, not put a podcast on and go for a walk in a new area that I haven't walked before, as in a new path, a new road or something, something a new area, because you get so used to taking these paths that you don't really look up, you're on your phone. You don't need to look up, because there's nothing new to see. Take a path, new area, even if it's just a plain old street, you can still notice something different, and kind of have your head up, be like, "Oh, I didn't notice this last time," kind of be in the moment.

The third thing, which I'm lucky it's for me, I'm a personal trainer. I've always had fitness in my life, just I go in for a workout, go get a good sweat on. Just kind of push out the fogginess in my head that way. Just put my phone down, go for 45 minutes to an hour, exert myself as much as possible and that's kind of, that's always a good way for me to just kind of restart and refresh for the rest of my day.

Lauren

That's awesome. Yeah. Yeah, and I totally relate to that, because going back to the social media thing, one of the things that helps me if I'm having one of those days, and I'm just in a fog or I just, I'm just feeling like nothing went right that I planned today, or I didn't do... I have morning routines too, I didn't do them. Sometimes deleting the social media apps off my phone, that's one thing that helps me and that I've recommended to other people before, because sometimes, you just need less of the stimulation.

Paul

Oh wow. You are ballsy and impressive. I would be too afraid that I couldn't get back into them.

 

Sharing Your Story Can be Impactful, and Not a Negative Thing

 

Lauren

Yeah, it's just, it's just been helpful, just to kind of stop some of the noise, and just get back to the present moment. But that can be hard if you're really connected and if you rely on social media to, maybe some people it helps them feel better and helps them feel connected as well. But I guess you have to find that balance.

Paul

Yeah, definitely, for a person. I'm lucky, people are telling me when I'm depressed, "You should get off social media, you're on so much. It can't be good for you." And I get it, why they tell me that. But really, everyone's different and it actually, I enjoy it. On Twitter, when I'm engaging and I'll put something out there, and someone like you will retweet or comment on it with something informational that I can reply with something informational or say, "Good job." I like that, it's like a form of therapy for me. It's like my second therapist. Now, I do get in it when you're like six hours in, your eyes are hurting because you've been writing, you've been there, you've been going through has been a positive thing for your day, but the brain is hurting, that's when I stop. Put the phone down, go for a walk. Kind of try to clear my head, and probably like you would do, I wouldn't delete them off my phone, I would just kind of throw it somewhere far away in my room and hopefully forget about it for 30 minutes.

 

Creating Small Wins to Stay Positive

 

Lauren

Out of sight, out of mind kind of thing.

Yeah. Which works too, awesome. Going back to the routine thing again, yeah. The video that I saw on Twitter, where you were talking about easy victories, I guess, and first thing in your day, things that you can do, can you talk a little bit about that?

Paul

Definitely. Definitely. It's kind of along the lines of the morning routine, like preparing yourself to have a good day. I find that the morning routine is just kind of prepare your body and your mind together, just for you, just to feel good after waking up. But the early win is, I've actually just kind of come across this, this last few months or so. I realize I've done it before, but whatever your job is or whatever your goal is in life, either it's a hobby, or you have something that you're working on, kind of a side gig, is trying to find something in that area that gives you passion and that you enjoy. But something that you can complete in it, in a 15-20 minute time frame.

15-20 minutes is not just because you only have so much time, it just means that it's something that can be easily achievable, not like a two, three hour journey that might fail and you might have to restart. An idea of this is, I just found out is, if I'm able to have a checklist in the morning and I have my first two things, I go in and I write five tweets about something positive someone can do for the day and a couple polls that they can relate to. And then write down in my journal and get that done, that means I can cross those two things off my checklist in 15-20 minutes after my morning routine, and I've had a good hour and a half of positive thinking, positive mindset, ready to help push me forward, instead of giving myself something that's going to take two hours like learn how to code on this thing, and do this, and there's a high chance of getting frustrated and pissed off at myself for not being able to get it.

And then there I am at 8:00 AM in the morning, spent all this time frustrated, angry, and then I have to go to my next thing in a bad mood. And that is where I find myself, is where the anxiety and depression have the biggest chance of coming into me and kind of ruining the rest of my day, because everything just kind of falls in on itself.

Lauren

That's such a good point. It's so easy to get into that, because oh, man. That's something I have to remind myself of as well, which I think is why I loved your video about that so much, because we don't really, we tend to forget about the little things, the little victories that we do throughout the day, right? Especially if we get so focused on, frustrated about something big we can't do.

Paul

Yeah, yeah. Definitely. And you saw me, I was pretty excited this morning about, mine was a bigger one because I had hit it and I knew it was going to take an hour or so to figure it out, but I finally did and it's catapulted my whole day. I'm here at 3:30 doing this with you. I've been super productive, I've been on a high and feeling good, which is great. You don't always get to feel like this with I think, mental health issues. Just general daily life if you're a normal person, it feels good to be on kind of a roller coaster high. So I set myself up for that high today with that win. And it worked out, and I was pretty pumped on that one, for sure.

Lauren

Yeah, that's awesome. And what was the win? Just to talk about it here.

Paul

It was linking a new blog post which I just posted today, 9 Signs of Depression in Mental Health of a Person, but I wanted to learn how to link inside to the separate sections in the blog. So you click at the very top, you can go down to each section by clicking through. And it just, I was diving into coding, and I've never coded before, so it kind of, it beat me up for the last couple days, let's just say that.

And then if I didn't get it done, I wouldn't have got my blog out today, which is a goal of mine. And if I didn't get my blog out, I would have been angry, because my goal is to do one a week, and then I'd have to wait to next week, and that would have pushed this other one back. And the thing is, when you make a win, it keeps things rolling. If you have a fail, I don't like saying failure, but I kind of want to, because you have to realize, if you don't get it, it is a negative thing. So make it easy for you to get it, they do fall back on each other if you don't do it. But then, they do help each other build up if you do. So, it allowed for the rest of my day to be planned out, and setting myself up for next week, just by today's win.

 

Never Alone

-Clothing Line to Support Positive Mental Health Awareness-

 

Lauren

Yeah, that's awesome. That's really great. So I wanted to talk about your clothing line, which is called Never Alone. And is it, are you currently in the process of getting that going?

Paul

I am, once again, this is one of those ones where I have to take each small win when they come. I am a, yes. Currently in the process of them, I've got everything, the tech pack, all that. Design, I'm figuring out the fabric at the moment, to get my first, real sample made which hopefully will be my initial line product. It's been an eight-month process so far.

It's been a lot of downs, unfortunately, that made me, definitely gave me some stressful times. But, it's a line in process, that's for sure.

Lauren

Yeah, I can imagine there are a lot of steps, when you're trying to, yeah, create clothing line, get it going. I don't even know all the steps you'd have to go through. I've never had to deal with that, but I imagine it's a lot.

Paul

Yeah. Yeah, there are. And I never had to either, so I had to learn them as I went. I definitely made some mistakes. I'm going to make some more mistakes, but it's for a great cause, and I'm super excited to get it out there and see what can be done with it. And see if I can inspire people to buy them and then promote their own Never Alone story with them.

Lauren

Great. So that's what I was going to ask. What's the main inspiration around creating it and your main goal with the clothing line?

Paul

The main inspiration actually came from after my father's death, I realized I've had two significant mental health areas where there have been serious downs, and focus on, because I've kind of needed something there to give me that corner stone to work on other things to make myself better, and I never think of it at the time. But afterwards, I look back, I'm like, "If I didn't start that, I probably wouldn't have gotten to where I am mentally." But yeah, so essentially that was one of those things. It was one of those stones to kind of help me not get over my dad, but work on something to help me, but also remember him. More that I think about it, he's part of this line and part of Never Alone and part of what I'm doing online. But essentially, the biggest thing is the starting off with hoodies called Never Alone, and what's going to happen with them is I'm still working out the percentage, just because of the numbers, I'm unsure of how much I'm going to be able to get them for and sell them for, but I would love for something around 10% of the sales of each hoodie to go to a mental health charity.

It will be some percentage, I'm not sure exactly what, but I want to give back to the community buying them. But my biggest thing was, I just didn't want them to be pieces of just a regular hoodie off the street that you could find anywhere. I wanted kind of for the growth of them to actually become a nice fashion piece, something that someone would be happy to wear out as a lifestyle piece, and then promote Never Alone and have that as a story behind it. I think that would help it grow more, and kind of reach more people who are afraid to talk about it. I don't want just the mental health community here. I want other people who don't kind of realize that they have these issues, find out about the clothing and then understand it, and think, "You know what? Maybe there's something here that I'm missing." That would be amazing if that would happen.

Lauren

And it's such a great, simple phrase. You know? Never Alone, I feel like that will get peoples attention, and it's just a reminder to us all. So what would you, what kind of advice would you give to somebody who maybe has been in your position, or is struggling with depression or anxiety and not really sure where to turn first, what to do first? What kind of advice would you give them for the first steps towards helping themselves?

Paul

I would say, if you think there's something going on and you can kind of read that something's off, but you're just not sure what, which is I think the biggest thing that most people have. It's, I believe there are more people like that than the ones that actually just wake up in the morning and you can't do anything.

We speak out the most like that, but I believe society has a lot of others that are just unaware that something's there. But if you do, the first thing is, go on Google and search, "Therapist around me." That's the best thing I believe that you can do for yourself. Find a therapist, find a counselor, take that step. Send that email just to see if they're open. You don't have to go see them, but just make that step of sending an email. It takes two minutes, and then you can decide from there. They are professionals, and they're there to help us and make us go through this. Other than that, as you yourself, as a person, it's really just taking things day-by-day.

Don't, if you feel bad and you feel down, don't say, "In 30 days I'm going to be a better person, I'm going to go ahead and that's my goal." I don't like putting numbers on things, I don't like people waiting to hit that goal, hit that mark. Because you never know what's going to happen. This is a crazy area in our body and our time and our brains, and we don't know exactly what's going on. So take it day-by-day, try to get as much sleep as possible, try to work out if possible. Doesn't mean going to the gym, but going for a walk, going for a run, hiking a mountain, getting physically fit and active for 60 minutes. Focus on what you're eating, a lot of sugar, a lot of carbs, a lot of stuff like that affects your gut, which then it does affect your brain.

Yeah, just focus on you. Focus on what you put in your body and what do you exert out? I know it's not always easy, especially if you don't have the background for it, but start small. Start small. Start with one salad a day, mix it up and get rid of that one fast food meal, and then go out for a walk.

Lauren

Well said. So I have to ask you since you are a personal trainer, do you, because my husband's actually a personal trainer too. And I know that he has said before, "It's not always just about the fitness." Sometimes you're, not that you're actually a therapist, but sometimes it might, it can feel that way because people will talk about what's going on in their life. Right?

Paul

Oh, I'm 100% a therapist.

Lauren

Yeah. Yeah, so what's that like? How does that feel?

Paul

Oh, I actually, I don't want to say that. People, I'm not a therapist, please don't listen to me and please don't quote me on something. Please, talk to your therapist. If you believe something's going on. But as a personal trainer, especially someone probably like your husband who's been at it for a long time, especially once you've got clients that you've had for three, five, 10 years, it's, you definitely are. I know them, I see them more than my family now. I don't live at home so I don't see my mom every week, but I see my clients three times a week and I've seen them three times for the last seven years. But it's great, because I like it, personally. Because I really, the personal training, becoming a personal trainer, that's the problem. There's like everything else, there's good, there's mediocre and there's unfortunately, bad.

The good ones I believe start helping you understand how your life can affect the gym and how the gym can affect your life. How you've been affecting, I'll learn something in the gym and take it into your day and to your eating habits and to your sleeping habits and to your work, and maybe help inspire you to make more money. Everything works together in my mind, in this world. If you're inspired in one area, you can help it kind of switch it up a little bit, give it some different language, but use the general context and get you inspired in another one.

So yeah, I've definitely noticed that with my clients.

Lauren

Yeah. Yeah, well and I think that can be a great thing, especially with your story and your background, and yeah, I mean, I've found that just physically moving my body everyday and doing something physical and feeling strong can have a huge impact on my mental health and vice versa.

Paul

I'm glad you have found that out. Yes. 100% I agree. I wish it was easier to explain to the world and these people who aren't doing it, and I hope they do find it sometime, but if everyone just worked out 60 minutes a day in this world, it would be, there would be a whole lot of healthier people and mentally happier people. It's great when people see it and you see the change from someone who is a nonbeliever to a believer, because it's the truth. It really does help you.

Lauren

Yeah, and I imagine it can be quite a struggle if you are depressed, or it's hard enough to get out of bed. What would you give as advice for somebody? I mean, you may have had clients like this, who struggle to actually get up and do things that are going to help them feel better overall. What kind of things do you, do you have any like tips or techniques that you give people?

Paul

Yeah, that's a tough one. I don't, everyone's different and everyone has a different aspect. So I totally understand that and respect that. And there's some areas where you're so depressed, you can't. Like, I've been there. I'm like, "I'm not going to the gym." And I'm a guy that goes to the gym. So, I totally understand if people can't go to the gym and they've never gone to the gym, than it must be extremely hard. You just have to, that one day where you're not feeling as bad or as down, just, it's, don't go to the gym if you don't have a gym membership, because you have to go through the journey of signing up and going through that, and that can give you anxiety, that can give you depression just on its own, which is totally understandable.

So, find something you can do on your own. Find a walk you can do alone. Once again, podcasts are great, because it kind of gets your mind out of things. You listen to something else and you go for a walk. Climb a hill, climb a mountain. But essentially it's like everything else. You just have to start one day and with something like that, I do like a goal. I do like a time frame. If you want to kind of get into the gym, start working out, give yourself a 30-day goal of hitting five days in a row, taking two days off, and doing five days in a row. That's all you can do. You can't look six months down the road after a week. You can look six months down the road after six months, because then you'll have seen the change, and you'll have started a pattern. You have to build patterns so your body and brain can understand that. And start noticing the positive effects, and then noticing effects when you don't go to the gym, you're like, "Damn, that doesn't feel good."

Lauren

Yeah, I find that what helps me a lot is thinking, and obviously like you said, everybody's different. But what helps me is thinking of it less from a place of discipline, but more of like self-care and like, "I know that if I do this, this is going to make me feel better." Not like, "I have to do this, or I'm going to punish myself." You know?

Paul

Yeah, no, that's a great way to think about it. That's amazing. Yeah, definitely. You just have to, some people just can't even get that concept of it, because they might not believe it.

I don't want to be negative, but, yeah. There's a lot of, it's a lot out there, and you just have to find the reason that makes you think it's good. And whatever reason it is that that works for you, then I'm totally down for that.

Lauren

Well, before we go ahead and wrap it up, is there anything else that you want to talk about? Anything else that you want to touch on while we have you on?

Paul

No, we hit a lot of stuff. Thank you for bringing up the clothing line. I would just love for anyone, if they want to learn more about it, they can head over to my website, and hit me up on Twitter, and it should be, I'm actually going to be going on I believe Kick Starter or one of the other ones and starting off there, just to kind of get a following, get a group launch. So if someone likes the concept and the idea and my story behind it, I would love to see them on there and I want people to tell their own story, so there's going to be a section in my website, so when you do buy one, you can then write in and tell your story if you feel like sharing it with the world. And I'll be sharing it through my social media and through my blog, and helping others, seeing what's happening to other people in this world, so hopefully they can be inspired by you.

Lauren

That's amazing. I love the idea of people sharing their own stories. That's so cool. And we will definitely, just for everyone listening, we'll put your website and your social media in our show notes and everything. Are you on other platforms besides Twitter, or is it mainly just Twitter?

Paul

No, actually, my biggest is Instagram. Instagram, Facebook, Twitter , but they're all @TallPaulsLife. I stick to the Tall Paul, I am 6'7".

Lauren

That's great. Awesome. Well, thank you so much Paul, for joining us. We're really glad to have you on. And we'll definitely be keeping in touch as far as the clothing line goes, and be excited to share that with everybody when it comes out.

 
 

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